Zoloft buzz

Posted: Sealeopard Date: 17-Feb-2019
Can you get high on <b>Zoloft</b>? - Addiction Blog

Can you get high on Zoloft? - Addiction Blog

So, when you feel an episode of anxiety and panic overtaking you, what exactly is going on inside your body? Most of the symptoms that I used to complain about the most were a racing heart rate, uncontrolled breathing, sweating, and the feeling that I wanted to bolt down the street running (FEAR). Sometimes when we are overwhelmed by stress and anxiety our bodies react by releasing a chemical called adrenaline, or what I call ‘anxiety juice.’ You can think of adrenaline as the fuel behind a lot of the symptoms and sensations that you endure. Adrenaline, also known as epinephrine, is a hormone and neurotransmitter that activates the fight or flight mechanism in your brain and body. The flight or fight mechanism is turned on when your brain registers danger or a high stress situation. It’s basically a survival tool that all animals have. Once your brain receives a message that your in trouble, adrenaline is pumped into your bloodstream and causes your heart rate to increase (increased oxygen), dilates pupils (for better vision), increases sweat production (keeps you cool in case you need to run), suppresses immune system (not needed in danger situations) and creates a general (but awful) feeling of fear. Exploding head syndrome (EHS) is a disorder characterized by the perception of loud noises (e.g. a bomb explosion, gunshot or cymbal crash) when going to sleep or awakening. Contrary to the name, ENS is not associated with pain. However the noise attacks can elicit a great deal of fear, confusion and distress in sufferers. Reports of tachycardia and palpitations are also common. Despite the distressing nature of EHS, relatively little is known about the prevalence and underlying cause of the condition. Some scientists have estimated that EHS may affect 10% of the population.

My brain on SSRIs - Philip Roberts

My brain on SSRIs - Philip Roberts

Curiosity is a major influence in many medical cases related to drug misuse, and this situation applies to some people that have tried to use Zoloft as a recreational drug. The recreational value that they hope to get from it is a form of “high.” However, there are health risks attached to this sort of behavior. They can appear as general Zoloft side effects of even in serotonin syndrome. Zoloft as an SSRI antidepressant increases the serotonin levels of the brain. The rebound effect of this for the user is an increased level of sensitivity to happiness and better emotional balance. However, in rare cases, users have reported feelings of euphoria after using the drug under special circumstances. So, while is not impossible for an SSRI antidepressant to give you a high, it is quite complicated. It feels as if your head, brain, or both have experienced a sudden and unexplainable tremor, vibration, buzz, shake, jolt, or zap. This sensation is also described as experiencing a head or brain jolt or zap as if it has been jolted by an electric shock. This feeling generally comes out of nowhere and doesn’t have a logical explanation. This symptom usually lasts only a few moments and then disappears. This feeling can affect a small part of your head or brain, or feel like your entire head and brain have been jolted. This feeling can occur rarely, frequently, or persistently and often occurs for no apparent reason. All variations and combinations of the above are common. Experiencing head and brain zaps is a common adverse reaction from prescription medications, including antidepressant and anti-anxiety medications. This symptom is also commonly associated with withdrawing from these types of medications.

Antidepressant Addiction and Abuse - Addiction Center
Antidepressant Addiction and Abuse - Addiction Center

Nov 19, 2018. Common antidepressants include Fluoxetine Prozac; Citalopram Celexa; Escitalopram Lexapro; Paroxetine Paxil; Sertraline Zoloft. Zoloft is classified as a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor. This class of antidepressants affects receptors in the brain that absorb the neurotransmitter serotonin. For a small amber or blue oval pill, Zoloft sure generates a lot of buzz -- and so do other members of its family of antidepressants.

Zoloft buzz
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